Category Archives: Tutorials

Using Force-Fit Eyelets

EGR-AA023_C_If you look at the inside of these eyelets you’ll see that you have two different pieces -a “male” and a “female” part (for lack of better terminology!)

Your fabric should be the thickness of the eyelet post. First, make a hole in your fabric that allows the female part to fit through snugly. Put the “female” part down on a hard flat surface, on top of that your fabric project with the hole cut out. Now put the “male” part on top and press very hard with the heel of your hand.

I don’t use a hammer. You could do that, but you’d need to cover the eyelets with a dishtowel or other thick fabric. You can purchase a rubber mallet at Home Depot or Lowes. These mallets are usually used to hammer down flooring tiles. Still, I would cover the hardware with a cloth to prevent it from getting scratched.

I find that once they snap together it’s really difficult to get them apart. So they’re pretty secure. If you want a bit of added assurance, you can add a few drops of a craft glue to the inside of the eyelets (GS Hypo Cement works great as does E6000 Craft Adhesive).

Some of the prong applied eyelets that we have work better for thinner project applications.

How to Apply Corners on Purse Flaps

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Metal corners add a nice finishing touch to a purse flap or wallet. One of my customers advised me that there is a bit of a learning curve involved in applying them. So, I thought I should write a tutorial to demonstrate a fairly easy way to install them.

First, gather your materials. You’ll need:

  • 2 metal corners.
  • Your project, ie, a purse flap or wallet on which to apply the corners.
    A strong, clear craft glue. I use E 6000, GS Hypo Cement also works well.
  • A Q-Tip
  • A hammer. You can use a wooden or hard rubber mallet if you prefer, I just use a regular old (and I think it really is old!) carpentry hammer, straight out of the toolbox.
  • A block of wood, a soft wood, like pine, works best.

Lay out the metal corners on your work table and identify the front and back sides:

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As you can see, the front side has a smooth, finished look. The back has two flanges at right angles to each other.

Now, put a drop of glue inside each corner:

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With your Q-Tip, spread the glue around the inside of each corner, giving them a thin, even coat. Put them aside and allow the glue to set up for about 10 minutes. After waiting 10 minutes or so the glue will still be tacky, but not oozy (is that even a word?)

Now, take the corners and position them on your project. In my case, it is a purse flap. Put them so that the front side is on the front of the flap, and the back side is on the back (I know, you didn’t need me to tell you that!):

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When the corner of your project piece is firmly sandwiched in the metal flap corner, take your block of wood and position it over just one of the flanges, like this:

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Now, hit the wood with your hammer. Don’t be afraid to hit it pretty hard. If you’re using a soft wood it won’t scratch the corner:

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Now, this will have bent one of the flanges inward, tightly enfolding your flap. This is what it will look like with just one of the flanges bent in:

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Now, turn your project ninety degrees and repeat the process on the other flange:

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When you’re done, it will look like this on the back:

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… and like this on the front:

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Now, just repeat the process on the other side, and you’re done!

Here’s the finished product. Front:

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… and back:

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I think it came out well. Now I just need to find the time to make a purse to which I can attach this lovely flap!

New Year, New Tutorial, Lots of Exciting New Things…

Oh what an unfaithful blogger I’ve been!  It’s mid-February and my last post was wishing you a happy holiday season!  Oh well, I’ll try to do better!  So far it has been a great new year here at Bagmaker Supply.  We have added hundreds of new items to our inventory (and there will be more every day.)    And … finally I’ve completed a new tutorial.  We started carrying zipper by the yard about a month ago, and I’m really excited about it.  You can make such nice purse zippers, much nice than the kind you see at the store.  And the best part is, they’re so much less expensive than the store-bought kind.  Tutorial 004_html_4d3e3b0

See?  Pretty nice, huh?  But I’ve noticed that some people are a little bit daunted by the prospect of making their own zipper.  Well, it does take a bit of practice, but once you get the hang of it, it’s super-easy.  To demonstrate how to do it, I’ve put together this new tutorial with step-by-step instructions.  Soon you’ll be making your own zippers, start-to-finish, in ten minutes flat!

A New Tutorial…

I like doing these tutorials.  It gives me a guilt-free reason to sew. Although the tutorial part of it slows down the actual sewing considerably…having to take a picture at every step. Realizing I’ve forgotten to take picture of an important step, and therefore having to re-do the step, slows things down even more!  Oh well, I’ll get the hang of it … I hope.

Our First Tutorial

So, I’d been touting our upcoming tutorial on social media, as Tutorial Tuesday. And then…yeesh, I didn’t actually post it on Facebook until Wednesday! Oh well, it couldn’t be helped. Our Word Press program kept crashing. But tech help arrived and we were able to get it up and running. So, click on the Tutorial link at the top of the page for The Absolute Beginner, a lined tote project. For those of you who don’t know, yes it is me in the photo. Sorry. Younger, cuter, more photogenic friends , family members and future family members (yes, that means you, Julie) were unavailable for modeling duties.